3.1 Overview of Relevant International Cybersecurity Bodies and Mechanisms (public and private) | Jack Goldsmith and a Berkman Center Cybersecurity Team | July 26, 2012

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3.1 Overview of Relevant International Cybersecurity Bodies and Mechanisms (public and private)

by Jack Goldsmith and a Berkman Center Cybersecurity Team Show/Hide
Purpose: To provide the reader an understanding of the theory behind Internet governance and the multi-stakeholder nature of the Internet. It will also outlines a number of globally relevant bodies and treaties, including ICANN, IETF, ITU, SCO, and the COE Convention on Cybercrime. EDIT PLAYLIST INFORMATION DELETE PLAYLIST

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  1. 1 Show/Hide More 3.1.1 Introduction to Internet Governance Frameworks
    Original Creator: Jack Goldsmith and a Berkman Center Cybersecurity Team
    Presents an overarching framework for Internet governance and discusses the difficulties that arise with coordinating regulation across the globe in a rapidly changing cyber-environment.
    1. 1.1 Show/Hide More Lawrence B. Solum, Models of Internet Governance, Illinois Public Law Research Paper No. 07-25, U Illinois Law & Economics Research Paper No. LE08-027, September 3, 2008
      This article takes a broad view of Internet governance, presenting three central ideas regarding Internet governance and five different models to Internet governance.
    2. 1.2 Show/Hide More Robert Knake, Internet Governance in an Age of Cyber Insecurity, Council on Foreign Relations, September 2010
      This article examines the technological decisions enabling the Internet’s success and vulnerabilities, then outlines an agenda that the United States can pursue with allies on the international stage
    3. 1.3 Show/Hide More Jeremy Ferwerda, Nazli Choucri, and Stuart Madnick, Institutional Foundations for Cyber Security: Current Responses and New Challenges, Working Paper CISL# 2011-05, May 2011
      This article examines the institutions responsible for addressing the security of cyberspace and international relations in the cyber-domain. It highlights emerging challenges while evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the current institutional framework.
    4. 1.4 Show/Hide More Jack Goldsmith, Cybersecurity Treaties: A Skeptical View, Future Challenges in National Security and Law, February 2011
      This article explains why international cooperation is considered central to the cybersecurity problem and examines three major hurdles to a global cybersecurity treaty. It then considers the feasibility of narrower and softer forms of cooperation.
    5. 1.5 Show/Hide More Abraham D. Sofaer, David Clark, and Whitfield Diffie, Cyber Security and International Agreements, Proceedings of a Workshop on Deterring Cyberattacks, pp. 179-206, 2010
      This piece discusses how the threats to cybersecurity are currently being approached at the private, national, and international level, then demonstrates the potential for increased international cooperation. It also covers how to fashion effective international initiatives and the difficulties in such negotiations.
  2. 2 Show/Hide More 3.1.2 Select Globally-Relevant Bodies and Treaties
    Original Creator: Jack Goldsmith and a Berkman Center Cybersecurity Team
    Provides an understanding of the major bodies and treaties that impact cybersecurity on a global-level, to include ICANN, ITU, SCO, and various international treaties.
    1. 2.1 Show/Hide More Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN)
      Original Creator: Jack Goldsmith and a Berkman Center Cybersecurity Team
      Provides an understanding of the major bodies and treaties that impact cybersecurity on a global-level, to include ICANN, ITU, SCO, and various international treaties.
      1. 2.1.1 Show/Hide More International Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, Memorandum of Understanding, November 1998
        This MOU between the Department of Commerce (DOC) and ICANN sets out that ICANN will provide expertise and advice regarding DNS, such as the allocation of IP number blocks and coordination of the assignment of other technical parameters to maintain internet connectivity.
      2. 2.1.2 Show/Hide More International Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, Affirmation of Commitments, September 2009
        This document affirms commitments by the DOC and ICANN, including: (a) the global technical coordination of the DNS is accountable, transparent, and in the public interest; (b) the security, stability and resiliency of the DNS is preserved; © competition, trust, and choice in the DNS marketplace continues; and (d) international participation in DNS coordination is facilitated.
      3. 2.1.3 Show/Hide More Jose MA. Emmanuel A. Caral, "Lessons from ICANN: Is self-regulation of the Internet fundamentally flawed?", International Journal of Law and Information Technology, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 1-31. 2004
        The paper discusses the overall benefits and negatives of self-regulation, using ICANN as the center of the discussion and comparing it to the IETF and W3C.
    2. 2.2 Show/Hide More Shanghai Cooperation Organization
      Original Creator: Jack Goldsmith and a Berkman Center Cybersecurity Team
      The Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) is a permanent intergovernmental international organization created on 15 June 2001 in Shanghai (China) by the Republic of Kazakhstan, the People’s Republic of China, the Kyrgyz Republic, the Russian Federation, the Republic of Tajikistan and the Republic of Uzbekistan.
      1. 2.2.1 Show/Hide More Yekaterinburg Declaration of June 16, 2009
        The Yekaterinburg Declaration calls for leaders to build a more just world order, to cement international stability and economic development. Regarding cyber security, the SCO member states stress the significance of the issue of ensuring international information security as one of the key elements of the common system of international security.
    3. 2.3 Show/Hide More The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)
      Original Creator: Jack Goldsmith and a Berkman Center Cybersecurity Team
      The Internet Engineering Task Force is a loosely coordinated and self-organized body that contributes to the engineering and evolution of Internet technologies. It is the principal body engaged in the development of new Internet standard specifications.
      1. 2.3.1 Show/Hide More The Internet Engineering Task Force, The Tao of IETF: A Novice's Guide to the Internet Engineering Task Force, 15 October, 2011
        This document describes the inner workings of IETF meetings and Working Groups, discusses organizations related to the IETF, and introduces the standards process. It is not a formal IETF process document but instead an informational overview.
    4. 2.4 Show/Hide More International Telecommunication Union (ITU)
      Original Creator: Jack Goldsmith and a Berkman Center Cybersecurity Team
      An agency of the United Nations focused on telecommunication networks and radio frequency allocations. In recent years, a number of UN members have sought to provide the ITU more regulatory power of the Internet, an ongoing, and contentious debate.
      1. 2.4.1 Show/Hide More Jeremy Ferwerda, Nazli Choucri, and Stuart Madnick, Institutional Foundations for Cyber Security: Current Responses and New Challenges, Working Paper CISL# 2011-05, May 2011
        This article examines the institutions responsible for addressing the security of cyberspace and international relations in the cyber-domain. It highlights emerging challenges while evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the current institutional framework.
      2. 2.4.2 Show/Hide More International Telecommunication Union, ITU’s Global Cybersecurity Agenda
        This site provides ITU’s framework for international cooperation aimed to enhance confidence and security in the cyber domain.
      3. 2.4.3 Show/Hide More Mcdowell, Robert M., The U.N. Threat to Internet Freedom, The Wall Street Journal, February 21, 2012
        This article provides a critical reaction to the treaty talks focused on potentially giving the United Nations unprecedented powers over the Internet through the International Telecommunication Union.
      4. 2.4.4 Show/Hide More Maclean, Don. “Sovereign Right and Dynamics of Power in the ITU: Lessons in the Quest for Inclusive Global Governance” in Drake, William J and Ernest J. Wilson III, eds. Governing Global Electronic Networks. Cambridge: The MIT Press. pp. 84-126, 2008
        This book offers the reader perspectives on the governance of global information and communication networks and uncovers the politics that lie beneath global rules and regulations that may seem at first glance to be mainly technical. It shows how the ITU is beset by new challenges from changing technologies and business models, as well as suggesting reforms.
    5. 2.5 Show/Hide More Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime
      This Convention was the first international treaty on cybercrime, and deals particularly with copyright, computer fraud, child pornography and network security. Its main objective is to pursue a criminal policy aimed to protect society against cybercrime by adopting appropriate legislation and fostering international cooperation.
    6. 2.6 Show/Hide More Organization of American States
      Original Creator: Jack Goldsmith and a Berkman Center Cybersecurity Team
      The OAS brings together all 35 independent states of the Americas and constitutes a political, juridical, and social governmental forum of the entire Hemisphere. In addition, it has granted permanent observer status to 67 states, as well as to the European Union (EU).
      1. 2.6.1 Show/Hide More A Comprehensive Inter-American Cybersecurity Strategy
        The OAS Cybersecurity Strategy recognizes that protecting networks and information systems is dependent upon: giving operators information to help them secure their networks and respond to incidents; fostering public-private partnerships to increase education of the private sector to secure their infrastructures; stimulating the adoption of standards and practices for information security; and fostering the adoption of cyber-crime policies and legislation to protect users and prevent and deter criminal misuse of computer networks, while respecting users’ privacy. On June 10, 2003, the OAS General Assembly passed Resolution: AG/RES. 1939 (XXXIII-O/03), on the Development of an Inter-American Strategy to Combat Threats to Cybersecurity.
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